Novak Djokovic Gets Stick for Weird US Open Celebration

It takes no microscope to see just how everything that Novak Djokovic does these days doesn’t go well with fans and followers. From organizing a tennis tournament without any COVID-19 precautions to defending his role in it, Djokovic hasn’t really been the perfect advert for the game of late. 

World No.1 Djokovic, however, remained unfazed with the criticism as he started his first round US Open match against Damir Dzumhur of Bosnia in style. Djokovic beat the world no. 109 with readings of 6-1 6-4 6-1. 

However, the Serbian star then went on to proceed with his usual celebration of thumping his chest and bowing down in front of the crowd. With no one inside the court, Djokovic kind of looked absurd and weird doing his routine celebrations. 

Djokovic had come into the tournament saying he would keep the celebrations alive and didn’t worry about the public backlash it would receive. 

Look, I’m going to keep on doing it because I just – I don’t know. I think it’s part of the routine,” Djokovic said.

It’s part of also me paying a tribute and a thanks to the match and to the court and to the occasion.”

We all know the reason behind crowd restrictions in place at the U.S. Open, but does Novak still want his stands to be full of people? Has he heard of a certain pandemic in place currently? 

YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ytr32bZehEo

Novak Djokovic Tests Positive for Corona Virus after Controversial Tennis Tour

Siberian Tennis star Novak Djokovic has tested positive for the viral pandemic COVID-19 after he organized a controversial tennis tournament in Eastern Europe with almost little to no regard for social distancing and the problems that can arise due to negligence. 

Djokovic issued a statement in late June, suggesting that he had caught the dreaded Corona Virus along with his wife, and coach. His children tested negative for the virus after double tests. 

Djokovic still went on to defend his decision for organizing the recent tennis tournament, saying that it was held in good intentions. 

We organized the tournament at the moment when the virus had weakened, believing that the conditions for hosting the Tour had been met,” he mentioned in his statement.

Everything we did in the past month, we did with a pure heart and sincere intentions. Our tournament meant to unite and share a message of solidarity and compassion throughout the region,” he further added.

Toni Nadal spoke to ESPN about the tournament and about Djokovic’s eventual COVID positive result. He mentioned this was a mistake literally anyone could make, and Djokovic has been the bigger man by coming out and apologizing for it. 

“It was a shame. A good initiative ended up being a coronavirus problem that has not been good for tennis or Djokovic. Everyone should have been more cared for,” he said. 

It’s a mistake anyone can make and Novak Djokovic has apologized for it 

“In Serbia, they were not so strict. It’s a mistake anyone can make and Djokovic has apologized but it’s a setback in the process of normalizing the circuit,” he said. 

The fallout after the Adria Tour has made USTA and ATP even more careful of what’s to come. With the cramped calendar this year, it won’t be a surprise if players opt out of major Grand Slams. 

YouTube link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=820TsEkIAWg

Do Tennis Matches Go On For Too Long? Butorac Thinks So.

Tennis

When it comes to Tennis, less is more for American tennis player and former president of the ATP Player Council, Eric Butorac. He is of the opinion that tennis must have shorter matches if it wants to engage a younger audience.

This, apparently, is what Butorac told his successor in the ATP Player Council, Novak Djokovic, and the member of the board, Andy Murray. “It’s too slow,” Butorac told Murray, “I’m too busy. I’ve got two kids, I’ve got stuff to do. I love watching you guys play but I don’t need four hours of it.”

On one hand, Butorac’s suggestion makes perfect sense. Men’s matches do have a tendency to go on for far too long, a fact that can be quite frustrating in today’s fast-paced lifestyle. The length of an average men’s singles match in the US Open in 2014 was around 2 hours and 44 minutes. And there was the legendary face-off between Djokovic and Nadal at the Australian Open final in 2012 which went on for 5 hours and 53 minutes.

The solution to the problem, however, is not as simple as it seems.

Firstly, it could face serious opposition from the tennis players, and there are a lot of them, who think longer is better. Even if, by some miracle, the proposal is accepted by the wider tennis community, it would raise more problems than it solves.

Would the matches consist of fewer sets in a match or fewer games in a set? Will the tennis community ever come to an agreement on this?

For now, that prospect seems highly unlikely.