Alexandr Dolgopolov Is a Match Fixer

Alexandr Dolgopolov does not have the nerve to keep away from controversy. Recently, the Ukrainian tennis player got accused of fixing a match.

Alexandr Dolgopolov

It has been long since the Ukrainian landed a match in Round 16 of the ATP Tournament. The pressure and nervousness were bound to build for such an inexperienced player. However, a true sportsman would trust his capabilities rather than resorting to fixing matches.

In a match played against T. Monteiro a few days earlier, a man who could not secure a single break point, and ranked 114th in the world, beat someone within 55 minutes, which is quite fascinating for many. Soon, the Tennis Integrity Unit—TIU—was taking notice of the unusual game prowess shown by Dolgopolov.

Furthermore, the betting was suspended due to some unusual moves. The suspicions were high after the match and when surrounded by the press, Dolgopolov’s statement was,

“I don’t give a f—k” about the media’s “circus”

Dolgopolov was clearly mad at being cornered and anger is the most obvious way out of such situations. It seems like the Ukranian doesn’t know much about handling top games. Back in 2011, he was accused of the same charges, but was lucky to get off the hook. Ironically, 2011 was the last time he reached a similar stage in the ATP Tournament.

The investigation into this incident is still underway.

Tennis Federation: Ignorant or Amoral?

Either the Tennis Federation is highly corrupt, or it lacks the ability to judge. Either way, it surely does a pathetic job.

Tennis Federation

Banning players is much like a hobby in tennis. The federation needs no reason to keep a player from featuring in a match. A recent “victim” was Sara Errani, an Italian tennis player. She conveniently took drugs to elevate her clearly pitiful performance in the court. Here’s the funny part: when caught, she blamed her mother’s home-made tortellini!

Yes, according to Sara, the drug found in her tests was apparently an ingredient of her mother’s secret recipe. The perplexing end of the story comes next, when the Tennis Federation considers it an honest mistake and applies a meager ban of two months on the player.

For context, the drug that was apparently an ingredient of Sara’s mother’s tortellini, is actually letrozole. It is used to treat breast cancer, and to enhance muscle tissue growth in female bodybuilders. The tennis federation somehow doesn’t have a clue. The investigation department at this Federation clearly has some people that need to be let go of, of course for the stellar job they have done in investigating Sara’s case.

The Italian player and former World’s Number 5 will be back in two months, more like an unplanned vacation for her after getting off the hook with a dope excuse.

Wimbledon Must Stop Being Sexist

Wimbledon is among the most sexist courts when it comes to scheduling matches.

Wimbledon Court 1

The infamous court features great matches and a star-strutted line of players, both men and women. More men than women in fact! It features two show courts, both of which were clearly booked for men’s matches. To be specific, in the initial week of the Wimbledon, the courts had 25 men’s matches compared to the 17 for women.

This clearly shows the sexist approach that Wimbledon has. It is as if the officials drool over the money and don’t care a gif about the time that is awarded to women to play on the court.  Statistics as such has made Wimbledon subject to blasphemy.

This issue continued to boil as a couple of key women’s matches were kept far from the limelight. The match between Jelena Ostapenko and Elena Svitolina is a perfect example. This match was played on Court 12. Jelena Ostapenko also spoke on the matter saying,

“I think I deserve to play on a better court than Court 12.”

Disappointingly, instead of confronting and working to solve the issue, officials have been giving out arguments in their defense, as if there could be anything to justify the matter. Wimbledon clearly needs to get its acts together, and step into the 21st Century.

Nadal Wins French Open: Loses Humility!

Rafael Nadal may know a lot about winning games, but he sure needs to learn a thing or two about being humble.

We all know the great form the Spaniard has been in recently. The prodigy, however, seems to be losing hold of his humility—a characteristic he had previously been known for. He recently won his 10th French Open with style. During his post-match speech, he went on to brag about his “unprecedented” success.

If that is not enough to rip his fake persona of humbleness apart, the Spaniard even had the audacity to imply that he was ‘the one’ to achieve the feat. Things like these are well understood, and other players don’t need a reminder of what you’ve done with your career.

With his 10th French Open, Nadal has won his fifteenth major title. This is certainly not the first incident where he showcased his arrogance though. Only recently in April 2017, Nadal bashed a 20-year old German—Alexander Zverve—for wanting to compete with him. Instead of inspiring the young athlete, he called him “strange”, just because Alexander had lost to Nadal thrice in the past.

He sure may be an icon in the court, but outside of it, fame and success have made him lose humility.

Djokovic Kicks His Coach Out!

Novak Djokovic

Novak Djokovic wants to win again. Instead of improving his own game though, he fires his coach, blaming him for what actually was the Serbian’s fault.

There is no doubt in the fact that Djokovic has an arrogant personality. His recent move to fire his coach clears any doubts anyone had in this regard. Marian Vajda—Djokovic’s ex coach—had been working with Djokovic for quite a long time. The Serbian also won several major and minor trophies with Vajda.

It’s funny how Djokovic labeled the parting of ways to be a “mutual decision” yet the entire staff stands in shock. The Serbian recently got knocked out in the quarterfinals of Monte Carlo Masters. Many believe that he only fired his coach to play the blame game—so people would rather blame Vajda instead of him for the pathetic performance in court.

Novak Djokovic had a great 2016 where he finished the Australian Open at second place. It must have hit him hard to slump from such a good position to being knocked out in the quarter-finals of a relatively minor trophy. If this wasn’t controversial enough on the player’s part, he went on to state that this “shock therapy” can actually help him get better results in the future.

Novak surely needs to understand that practice makes perfect. If firing coaches were to turn into trophies, tennis would have become a coach-less sport a long time ago.