Djokovic and His Petty Excuses!

Nadal-Djokovic-Australian-Open-final

We all know Novak Djokovic for the feats he pulls off on the tennis court, right? I mean, who could forget the 2012 Australian Open Final, which lasted for almost six hours, before an exhausted Djokovic emerged victorious. Regardless of how phenomenal that match between Nadal and Djokovic might have been, it’s a surprise that Djokovic is using it to justify his injury stricken 2017.

In a recent tweet, Novak Djokovic blamed that final for the fact that he and Nadal are in need of rehabilitation after the injuries that they suffered in 2017. Not only that, he went on to comment on how Roger Federer now has a chance to usurp the title of number one tennis player in the world, all because Nadal had to go through that fateful match back in 2012.It’s a surprise that Djokovic claims that the match had lasting impacts on him and Nadal, especially when you consider how much younger the two tennis stars were back in 2012.

To claim that the only reason why Federer—one of the greatest of all time—has got a chance of becoming number one again is Nadal’s injury, would be absolutely preposterous. Federer is 36 now and still less prone to injury than Nadal and Djokovic, who are supposedly in their prime. Both Djokovic and Nadal need to take lessons on fitness from Roger Federer, instead of moping about how a match has had lasting impact on them. It’s a fact that only the fittest survive!

Djokovic Kicks His Coach Out!

Novak Djokovic

Novak Djokovic wants to win again. Instead of improving his own game though, he fires his coach, blaming him for what actually was the Serbian’s fault.

There is no doubt in the fact that Djokovic has an arrogant personality. His recent move to fire his coach clears any doubts anyone had in this regard. Marian Vajda—Djokovic’s ex coach—had been working with Djokovic for quite a long time. The Serbian also won several major and minor trophies with Vajda.

It’s funny how Djokovic labeled the parting of ways to be a “mutual decision” yet the entire staff stands in shock. The Serbian recently got knocked out in the quarterfinals of Monte Carlo Masters. Many believe that he only fired his coach to play the blame game—so people would rather blame Vajda instead of him for the pathetic performance in court.

Novak Djokovic had a great 2016 where he finished the Australian Open at second place. It must have hit him hard to slump from such a good position to being knocked out in the quarter-finals of a relatively minor trophy. If this wasn’t controversial enough on the player’s part, he went on to state that this “shock therapy” can actually help him get better results in the future.

Novak surely needs to understand that practice makes perfect. If firing coaches were to turn into trophies, tennis would have become a coach-less sport a long time ago.